Herbal Medicine for Breast Cancer – Wormwood

Herbal Medicine for Breast Cancer – Wormwood

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Herbal Medicine for Breast Cancer – Wormwood

Wormwood (Artemesia annua) belongs to the Asteraceae or Compositae family, also known as the daisy family. Wormwood is an important herb with many health benefits. It has been utilized by herbal medicine doctors for centuries.

Wormwood contains a number of biologically active compounds like ascorbic acid, carotenoids, flavonoids, phenolic acids, tannins, sesquiterpenes and thujone, which give this herb so much of its healing potential. Its benefits include:

* expelling intestinal worms
* helps to break down bilirubin, so can benefit jaundice
* improves digestive disorders
* an effective anti-malarial
* potent antimicrobial
* antifungal
* assists Crohn’s Disease and SIBO
* anticancer

More specific to this discussion, wormwood contains a potent phytochemical known as artemisinin, which has been found to have potent activity against breast cancer.

The Research on Artemisinin

A 2017 Czech review of medical research [1] on the anticancer properties of artemisinin is lengthy but worth reading as it reviews the medical literature up to 2017. Among its discussions are the ability of artemisinin to produce free radicals which help to destroy a tumor, induction of apoptosis (cell death – absent in cancer cells), inhibition of angiogenesis (the ability of a developing tumor to create new blood vessels in order to feed itself), induce cell cycle arrest (slowing the rapid growth of a tumor), and induce ferroptosis (a type of programmed cell death dependent on iron). Also discussed were several studies where artemisinin was combined with other drugs to work synergistically against breast cancer cells. Additionally, this review discusses the fact that most of the research has been preliminary (cell studies and animal studies), but very few clinical trials with actual humans (be sure to read Table 1 for this information). So there’s that to be considered.

We have known for nearly 20 years that artemisinin becomes cytotoxic (toxic to cancer cells) in the presence of ferrous iron. [2] One of its modes of action is that artemisinin selectively kills cancer cells by forming free radicals when it reacts with iron.

Early studies on artemisinin and lab animals have been very encouraging. One 2006 study [3] found that when artemisinin was included in the feed of rats who were administered a carcinogenic drug, it significantly delayed onset of breast tumors, and the tumors these rats did have were much smaller and fewer than in the controls.

In a 2008 cell study [4] using estrogen receptor position (ER+) and progesterone receptor positive (PR+) metastatic breast cancer cells, artemisinin was found to selectively decrease the function of estrogen receptor alpha (associated with promotion of rapid growth of breast cells) while leaving estrogen receptor beta (associated with opposing the rapid growth of breast cells) alone. In addition, when researchers treated this line of breast cancer cells with a combination of artemisinin and the antiestrogen drug fulvestrant (Faslodex), the combo resulted in a synergistic reduction of estrogen receptor alpha and enhanced cell cycle arrest – better than either substance on its own. Researchers stated “Our results show that artemisinin switches proliferative human breast cancer cells from expressing a high ERa:ERß ratio to a condition in which ERß predominates, which parallels the physiological state linked to antiproliferative events in normal mammary epithelium.” The information in that study I found exciting!

A 2009 animal study [5] found that artemisinin, when combined with transferrin (a protein that allows iron to be transported through the bloodstream), significantly slowed the growth rate of breast tumors in rats.

A 2011 animal study [6] found that artemisinin dimers (dimers are molecular complexes consisting of two identical molecules linked together) were “considerably more potent” than the artemisinin monomer in killing a highly metastatic line of breast cancer cells in rats.

A 2012 study [7] sought to discover the method by which artemisinin works – to understand what is actually happening at the genetic level. These researchers found that artemisinin downregulated (reduced) the expression of several key genes involved in the promotion of cancer cells which ultimately led to cell cycle arrest (a good thing in cancer cells).

A 2012 cell study [8] investigated the results of artemisinin dimers and artemisinin combined with transferrin against both prostate cancer cells and ER+/PR+ metastatic breast cancer cells. They found that both strongly downregulated proteins involved in the survival of these cancer cells, and also downregulated the HER2 oncogene.

Artemisinin has also been combined with Tamoxifen and estrogen in 2020 research [9] which investigated their effectiveness against prostate cancer and ER+ breast cancer. They used the estrogen-artemisinin hybrid with exceedingly good results against prostate cancer, and artemisinin plus sulfamate based estrogen analogues, which are a new class of potential medications against hormone-dependent cancers, with good results against the ER+ cancer cells.

In 2017, researchers released a study [10] wherein artemisinin was combined with chitosan magnetic nanoparticles to improve its delivery to breast cancer tumors in mice. They found that this method greatly enhanced the delivery and that it improved the anti-proliferative (to proliferate means to grow quickly) and anti-angiogenic (angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels – something a cancer tumor does to help feed itself) activities of artemisinin against cancer cells, resulting in very little toxicity to normal healthy cells.

A 2017 cell study [11] looked to see whether artemisinin could also alter breast cancer cell motility, which refers to the ability of cells to move and migrate (and possibly spread). They found that artemisinin altered the expression of 84 genes involved in cell motility in a line of ER+/PR+ metastatic breast cancer cells, strongly inhibiting cancer cell growth, migration and invasion.

Another 2017 study [12] investigated the effect of artemisinin on drug-resistant breast cancer cells. They found that artemisinin modified iron metabolism in breast cancer cells and had a cytotoxic effect on these cells, but also induced changes in the expression of iron-regulating genes which have been implicated in drug-resistance. Researchers stated that artemisinin could be beneficial in modulating cell sensitivity towards chemotherapeutic agents in cancer treatments (which just means that artemisinin helped to sensitize cells that were resistant to certain chemotherapy drugs).

A 2018 test tube study [13] looked at the role of artemisinin (using synthetic derivatives) with cancer-associated fibroblasts, cells that are normally abundant in connective tissue and play an important role in wound healing by secreting collagen. In cancerous tissue, fibroblasts are part of the tumor microenvironment and are involved in tumor growth and metastasis. This study found that artemisinin suppressed genetic signaling to suppress cancer-associated fibroblast activity.

As we know, one of the favored regions for breast cancer to spread is to the bones. A 2018 cell and animal study [14] investigated artemisinin’s role with osteoclasts, cells that are responsible for the resorption of bone. Bone is continually being remodeled by the action of osteoblasts – cells that build bone – and osteoclasts – cells that break down bone. It is desirable that osteoblast/osteoclast activity be balanced. In this study, researchers not only found that artemisinin inhibited rapid growth of breast cancer cells by activating apoptosis (planned cell death) pathways, but also inhibited the formation and differentiation of osteoclasts in several key ways. So it may be protective for bones, as well.

Scientists have also been using artmesinin together with nanoparticle technology to improve the delivery and cytotoxicity of substances like artmesinin directly to a tumor, without the need for taking high doses of herbs like wormwood, which could have possible side effects. [15]

A 2019 animal study [16] found that artmesinin significantly increased apoptosis in this aggressive mouse model of triple negative breast cancer. It also decreased levels of a protein known as TGF-beta (transforming growth factor beta) and slowed tumor growth, while increasing interferon-gamma, a cytokine secreted by key immune cells, including natural killer cells. This effectively means that artemisinin may enhance the immune response and ease immunosuppression, as well as reducing tumor growth in triple negative breast cancer.

From all of the studies I read, it appears that wormwood with its artemisinin content could be very beneficial for all forms of breast cancer – ER+, PR+, ER-, PR- and HER2+. I would definitely recommend working with your integrative doctor, herbalist or naturopath for proper dosing.

A Caution When Taking Artemisinin

A 2014 study [17] warned that chlorogenic acid (a phytochemical found in many different foods including almonds, apples, artichoke, avocados, bell peppers, black beans, black raspberries, blackberries, blackcurrants, blueberries, carrots, cherries, chia seeds, chickpeas, chilies and hot peppers, coffee beans, cranberries, dandelion greens, eggplant, figs, garlic, goji, grapefruit, graviola, guava, kiwi, kohlrabi, lemons, lentils, lingonberries, lychee, mulberries, nectarines, passionfruit, peaches, peanuts, pears, plums, pomegranates, raspberries, rice bran, spinach, sunflower seeds, and tomatoes) acted as an antagonist to artemisinin, nearly negating its anticancer effects. All of these foods are highly recommended for a cancer patient, however, perhaps avoid eating them for several hours after taking wormwood. 

References:
[1] Anticancer Activity of Artemisinin and its Derivatives – http://ar.iiarjournals.org/content/37/11/5995.long
[2] Selective toxicity of dihydroartemisinin and holotransferrin toward human breast cancer cells – https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0024320501013728
Iron is significant to cancer cells, they require it to fuel the rapid growth of a tumor.
[3] Oral artemisinin prevents and delays the development of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced breast cancer in the rat – https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0304383505000728
[4] Artemisinin selectively decreases functional levels of estrogen receptor-alpha and ablates estrogen-induced proliferation in human breast cancer cells – https://academic.oup.com/carcin/article/29/12/2252/2476466
[5] Artemisinin-Transferrin Conjugate Retards Growth of Breast Tumors in the Rat – http://ar.iiarjournals.org/content/29/10/3807.short
[6] Effects of Artemisinin Dimers on Rat Breast Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo – http://ar.iiarjournals.org/content/31/12/4111.short
[7] Antiproliferative effects of artemisinin on human breast cancer cells requires the downregulated expression of the E2F1 transcription factor and loss of E2F1-target cell cycle genes – https://journals.lww.com/anti-cancerdrugs/Abstract/2012/04000/Antiproliferative_effects_of_artemisinin_on_human.3.aspx
[8] Effects of Transferrin Conjugates of Artemisinin and Artemisinin Dimer on Breast Cancer Cell Lines – http://ar.iiarjournals.org/content/33/1/123.short
[9] Synthesis of Tamoxifen-Artemisinin and Estrogen-Artemisinin Hybrids Highly Potent Against Breast and Prostate Cancer – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7496903/
[10] Artemisinin loaded chitosan magnetic nanoparticles for the efficient targeting to the breast cancer – https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0141813016327222
[11] Transcriptome analysis of genes associated with breast cancer cell motility in response to Artemisinin treatment – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5732364/
[12] Artemisinin modulating effect on human breast cancer cell lines with different sensitivity to cytostatics – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28361857/
[13] Artemisinin derivatives inactivate cancer-associated fibroblasts through suppressing TGF-ß signaling in breast cancer – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6258160/
[14] Artemisinin inhibits breast cancer-induced osteolysis by inhibiting osteoclast formation and breast cancer cell proliferation – https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jcp.27875
[15] Potential of bacterial culture media in biofabrication of metal nanoparticles and the therapeutic potential of the as-synthesized nanoparticles in conjunction with artemisinin against MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30443899/
[16] Artemisinin enhances the anti-tumor immune response in 4T1 breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo – https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1567576919301274
[17] Comparative Cytotoxicity of Artemisinin and Cisplatin and Their Interactions with Chlorogenic Acids in MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells – https://chemistry-europe.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/cmdc.201402285

 

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About Marnie Clark

marnie clark breast cancer coach

Hi I’m Marnie Clark, breast cancer survivor turned coach. I have 20 years of experience in natural medicine.  In 2004/05 I battled breast cancer myself. You can see more about my journey on my page Breast Cancer Diary.

I’ve been healthy and recurrence-free since 2004 and in 2012 I became a Breast Cancer Coach because I became aware of the fact that whilst there is now a wealth of information on the Internet, much of it is confusing, conflicting, and sometimes just wrong!

So it is my duty to help you unconfuse and untangle all that information, and find what works for YOU.

GET MY BEST TIPS on healthy ways to beat breast cancer and prevent recurrences by signing up for my free e-newsletters and eBooks.

You can also “like” me on Facebook (Marnie Clark, Breast Health Coach) to get my inspirational snippets, news and updates. I promise to do my utmost to keep you informed and empowered on your healing journey… and beyond.

Subscribe On YouTube

marnie clark youtube

Subscribe For Extra Support

Welcome to the Marnie Clark Breast Care Community. When you join my virtual family you will receive my informative newsletter PLUS my gift to you, these 2 eBooks valued at $47 to empower and support you on your breast cancer journey.

My subscribers also get a treasure trove of info on nutrition, supplements and lifestyle tips on surviving breast cancer.

“Thank you for the email and the meaningful words. I also wanted to thank you for being with me during my treatments. Your emails and posts not only gave me information but lots of courage.” Susan Z, Canada

Your Mastectomy Recovery – 9 Things That Make a Huge Difference

Your Mastectomy Recovery – 9 Things That Make a Huge Difference

free-ebooks-breast-cancer-marnie-clark

Subscribe to be notified when new articles are published. You’ll also receive my 2 free ebooks to assist you on your journey.

My subscribers also get a treasure trove of info on nutrition, supplements and lifestyle tips on surviving breast cancer.

Your Mastectomy Recovery – 9 Things That Make a Huge Difference

Your Mastectomy Recovery – 9 Things That Make a Huge Difference

If you have recently been diagnosed with breast cancer and your surgeon has advised that a mastectomy is the wisest course of action, there are things you need to know — things that will make a huge difference to your healing process and mastectomy recovery. These are things that your doctor probably doesn’t know about!
 
In this video, I have covered 9 different things that will help you a LOT to recover from your mastectomy surgery. I share which things reduce bruising and pain and speed recovery (as well as a very particular protocol for using them), which foods and supplements and other things make the biggest difference to your mastectomy recovery.
 
If you can, please watch the video prior to your mastectomy surgery because tip #1 is a homeopathic protocol that needs to be started (for best results) prior to surgery.
 
And just so you are fully aware, there are times when a mastectomy is recommended but not necessarily warranted. You can find out more information in my article: Please Don’t Needlessly Lose Your Breasts to Mastectomy. I share this with you just so that you are aware that often you do have a choice and to hopefully empower you with enough information to help you make the best decision for yourself.
 
I hope you found this helpful. If you are recently diagnosed, for more support you may also want to visit my page Recently Diagnosed? Start Here

Article Topics

About Marnie Clark

marnie clark breast cancer coach

Hi I’m Marnie Clark, breast cancer survivor turned coach. I have 20 years of experience in natural medicine.  In 2004/05 I battled breast cancer myself. You can see more about my journey on my page Breast Cancer Diary.

I’ve been healthy and recurrence-free since 2004 and in 2012 I became a Breast Cancer Coach because I became aware of the fact that whilst there is now a wealth of information on the Internet, much of it is confusing, conflicting, and sometimes just wrong!

So it is my duty to help you unconfuse and untangle all that information, and find what works for YOU.

GET MY BEST TIPS on healthy ways to beat breast cancer and prevent recurrences by signing up for my free e-newsletters and eBooks.

You can also “like” me on Facebook (Marnie Clark, Breast Health Coach) to get my inspirational snippets, news and updates. I promise to do my utmost to keep you informed and empowered on your healing journey… and beyond.

Subscribe On YouTube

marnie clark youtube

Subscribe For Extra Support

Welcome to the Marnie Clark Breast Care Community. When you join my virtual family you will receive my informative newsletter PLUS my gift to you, these 2 eBooks valued at $47 to empower and support you on your breast cancer journey.

My subscribers also get a treasure trove of info on nutrition, supplements and lifestyle tips on surviving breast cancer.

“Thank you for the email and the meaningful words. I also wanted to thank you for being with me during my treatments. Your emails and posts not only gave me information but lots of courage.” Susan Z, Canada

Mistletoe Therapy for Breast Cancer

Mistletoe Therapy for Breast Cancer

free-ebooks-breast-cancer-marnie-clark

Subscribe to be notified when new articles are published. You’ll also receive my 2 free ebooks to assist you on your journey.

My subscribers also get a treasure trove of info on nutrition, supplements and lifestyle tips on surviving breast cancer.

Mistletoe Therapy for Breast Cancer

Mistletoe Therapy for Breast Cancer

Mistletoe is one of the most widely studied alternative therapies for cancer. But is it effective? Is mistletoe therapy good for breast cancer, specifically?

About the Plant

Mistletoe is a parasitic plant that attaches itself to the branches of other shrubs and trees that grow near it, and it burrows into the inner wood of the host and sucks the water and nutrients from the sap of that host plant. Kind of disgusting, right? So how could such a plant be of benefit for breast cancer? Read on, and I’ll explain.

There are over 1300 species of mistletoe plants growing across the world including Europe, North America, Africa, Asia, Australia and New Zealand. However, the focus of this article is mainly on European Mistletoe (Viscum album), the most studied species.

Mistletoe has been utilized as a powerful herbal medicine for hundreds of years for many different ailments. More recently, Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925), the Austrian philosopher and founder of anthroposophical medicine, introduced it as a powerful anticancer medicine.

How Mistletoe is Being Utilized in Cancer Clinics

Mistletoe therapy is prescribed by naturopaths and integrative doctors to help stimulate the immune system, improve quality of life and improve symptoms for those going through conventional therapies like chemotherapy and radiotherapy, for reducing tumor size and slowing the progression of the disease.

Mistletoe is most commonly given as a subcutaneous, intramuscular injection, or as an intravenous infusion given over a period of hours. Mistletoe can also be taken as a capsule in a supplement or taken as a tea/tincture (but the latter are considered to be much less effective).

Mistletoe Product Names

Mistletoe products are marketed under the names of Iscador®, Helixor®, Eurixor®, Lektinol®, Isorel® and abnobaVISCUM®. Generally, these are made as extracts and prepared in water and alcohol-based solutions or as a water-based solution. The best ones are standardized to the lectin content, and I’ll explain more about that below.

Mistletoe’s Phytochemicals

Mistletoe contains a number of biologically active compounds including lectins (classified as I, II and III), viscotoxin (a protein), flavonoids, amino acids, triterpenes, phenylpropanoids, phytosterols, alkaloids, polyalcohols, polysaccharides, glycosides and tannins.

Of those phytochemicals, it is mainly the lectins, and in particular lectin I, that have been the most studied. [1]  As noted above, most commercial products are standardized to the lectin content, which means that the product contains a specific amount of lectins, guaranteeing that the consumer is buying a product in which the chemistry is consistent from bottle to bottle. However, I suspect it is all of the compounds listed above working in synergy that gives mistletoe its therapeutic potential.

Research Studies on Mistletoe

Quite a number of studies have been conducted over the past several decades to assess whether mistletoe is effective as a treatment for cancer. The website pubmed.gov has over 800 studies on mistletoe. Overall, the news is good – mistletoe therapy appears to be particularly effective for improving the immune system and quality of life in cancer patients.

Having said that, the studies vary quite a bit in quality, which is usually the case with natural products, ranging from case reports on a single individual to randomized controlled trials. There have also been quite a few systematic reviews and meta-analyses of research, always helpful when deciding whether a substance has benefit. I’ve done my best to summarize the studies I found to be most helpful.

Research: Immune System Benefits of Mistletoe

Mistletoe lectins and polysaccharides have been shown in research to have immune boosting properties, to increase the cytotoxic (cancer cell killing) activity of white blood cells known as macrophages, to stimulate phagocytosis (cancer cell eating) by immune cells, to increase the secretion of cytokines known as TNF-alpha, interleukin-1, interleukin-2 and interleukin-6, to activate T-cells, and to increase the number and activity of natural killer (NK) cells, improving their ability to interact with and more effectively recognize cancer cells [2]–[9].

One German clinical study in particular [10] investigating the effects of mistletoe for breast cancer patients found that it gave “statistically significant increases of defined peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets (helper T-cells, natural killer (NK)-cells)”, enhanced interleukin-2 receptors and had other immune-related benefits.

One small Swiss study [11] found that mistletoe therapy given over a longer term (2 or more years) may have a greater benefit for the immune system than shorter term therapy. Although a small study, the data indicated that half of the patients (6 out of 12) with long-term mistletoe treatment had a continuous complete remission, whereas only two out of 15  patients with short-term treatments had complete remission.

A small Korean clinical trial [12] investigated mistletoe therapy in 20 women with early stage  breast cancer who had surgery, followed by chemotherapy and radiation. The researchers found that subcutaneous injections of mistletoe for 7 weeks immediately following surgery resulted in significant increases in the concentration of Interleukin-6 (an important cytokine, or chemical messenger, involved in immune response) and Interferon-gamma (the primary activator of macrophages, natural killer cells and neutrophils), all of which you want working on your behalf for killing cancer cells!

Research: Anti-Tumor Properties of Mistletoe

It is believed that the lectins, as well as the viscotoxins and alkaloids in mistletoe all play a part in the cytotoxic activity of mistletoe. A number of cancer pathways appear to be involved, including inhibition of protein synthesis, promotion of apoptosis (planned cell death) and necrosis (cell death). 

Studies that investigated tumor response, including incidence of recurrence and remission, are somewhat inconclusive. A Cochrane review [13] included 21 randomized controlled trials, seven of which investigated tumor response. Of those seven studies, only two reported a possible benefit in tumor response, while the other five reported no benefit. 

In 2008, a 37-year-old American woman, Ivelisse Page, was diagnosed with stage IV colon cancer. Despite having 15 inches of her colon resected and losing 28 lymph nodes, the cancer migrated into her liver. She had a second surgery in which 20 percent of her liver was removed. One of Page’s doctors, Peter Hinderberger, MD, suggested she try mistletoe – he’d seen patients do well after mistletoe injections. Her oncologist, Dr Luis Diaz at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, had a look at the studies on mistletoe and decided to see how Page went with it. Dr Diaz stated, “… as soon as she went on it, she started feeling better. That’s a universal feature I’ve seen in all patients who get mistletoe.” Page is now cancer-free and in an effort to get mistletoe therapy to be more widely utilized for American patients, she and her husband formed a nonprofit called Believe Big, to raise funds for a clinical trial in the United States. This research is ongoing but has been curtailed due to the coronavirus pandemic, along with another, similar trial ongoing in the United Kingdom. (For more information, to read her story, or to donate, paste this link into your browser: https://believebig.org/clinicaltrial/ )

A 2009 systematic review [14] investigating breast and gynecological cancers included nine studies that were assessed for tumor remission or time to relapse after mistletoe treatment. Of these nine studies, three reported a significant benefit from mistletoe therapy.

A 2014 German paper [15] discussed a case report of a 78-year-old patient with adenoma of the colon. This patient had a relapse of cancer that had been treated 5 years previously with surgery only. He had refused chemotherapy and the recurrent cancer wasn’t a good candidate for surgery again. He was treated with two injections of mistletoe directly into the tumor site to limit tumor growth. 8 months later, the man was cancer free.

A 2016 cell study [16] investigated the possible interaction between mistletoe and the monoclonal antibody drug Trastuzumab (Herceptin) for those with HER2+ breast cancer. Researchers found that mistletoe did not interfere with the cytotoxic activity of the drug, and that the two in combination seemed to exhibit complementary anti-cancer effects, at least in the test tube.

Research: Quality of Life Improvement for Cancer Patients

Mistletoe therapy is widely known for its benefits in improving the quality of life and management of symptoms for cancer patients. We’ve already seen the benefits for the immune system – most studies demonstrated that mistletoe is effective for stimulating immune function, which is quite important for the well-being of these patients. In addition, mistletoe therapy can help with a number of other factors.

Some of the documented improvements in quality of life can be attributable to how mistletoe helps with symptom management, especially in relation to chemotherapy. [17]-[18] Interestingly, doctors using a combination of mistletoe with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for their cancer patients will tell you that the mistletoe seems to improve the side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy including nausea and vomiting, fatigue and diarrhea, and improves recovery from those side effects. 

A 2008 Cochrane review [13] of mistletoe studies noted that most of the studies were not of high methodological quality, but that “there is some evidence that mistletoe extracts may offer benefits on measures of QOL [quality of life] during chemotherapy for breast cancer.

A small 2013 randomized controlled trial [19] with 123 breast cancer patients also receiving adjuvant chemotherapy showed an improvement in quality of life (eg less insomnia, loss of appetite, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, constipation, and fatigue) for those patients receiving the mistletoe therapy in addition to the chemotherapy. 

A 2014 review of studies [20] on mistletoe therapy for breast cancer patients found that the majority of the clinical trials reviewed suggested a beneficial effect with respect to survival, improved quality of life, positive remission rate, and reduction of chemotherapy-caused side effects for breast cancer patients treated with mistletoe extracts.

A 2016 research review [21] found that mistletoe therapy for cancer patients showed “promising results” for improvement of the quality of life and reduction of fatigue in patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy.

Research: Does Mistletoe Therapy Increase Survival?

A number of study reviews have been conducted investigating this question, with mixed results. While some studies report increased survival with mistletoe therapy, other studies have not.

A 2008 meta-analysis [22] of studies on mistletoe therapy for breast cancer patients found that mistletoe therapy (specifically Iscador) might prolong overall survival and improve the patients’ ability to cope with their illness better.

A 2009 meta-analysis [23] on mistletoe for cancer patients stated “Despite obvious limitations, and strong hints for a publication bias which limits the evidence found in this meta-analysis, one cannot ignore the fact that studies with positive effects of VA-E [Viscum album extracts] on survival of cancer patients are accumulating.”

A 2012 meta-analysis [24] suggested a moderate improvement in the survival of cancer patients receiving mistletoe therapy.

A 2014 review of studies [20] on mistletoe therapy for breast cancer patients found that the majority of the clinical trials reviewed suggested a beneficial effect with respect to survival, in addition to improved quality of life, positive remission rate, and reduction of chemotherapy-caused side effects for breast cancer patients treated with mistletoe extracts.

I was surprised to read that a 2017 German retrospective study [25] wasn’t so positive. Over 18,000 women with invasive breast cancer were included in the study and it investigated patients treated with and without mistletoe lectin in addition to standard breast cancer treatment. The study concluded that they did not observe any difference in the overall survival, recurrence-free survival, or quality of life between breast cancer patients with standard treatment and those who received both standard treatment and  mistletoe therapy. I felt I must include this data, and not only the positive studies.

The Cost of Mistletoe Therapy

In several progressive European countries including Germany, the insurance system pays for the cost of mistletoe therapy. That is definitely not the case in North America, Australia, or other non-European countries. The cost of mistletoe therapy can vary, and depends on the extract strength being used, and the frequency of administration. In the United States you can expect an IV infusion of mistletoe (if you can find a doctor to administer it) to average between $200-300 per month (but of course that’s a lot cheaper than the cost of chemotherapy.)

Possible Side Effects

Most studies found that mistletoe is generally well tolerated, adverse affects are few. [13]-[14], [26]-[27]. If side effects are experienced, they are usually minor, depend on the dose, and normally go away within a few days post-treatment. If side effects are experienced they may include some swelling, warmth, pain, redness or itchiness at the injection site. Also fatigue, mild flu-like symptoms, mild fever and diarrhea have been noted.

Contraindications and Warnings

Always consult with your chosen health professional before utilizing mistletoe in any form. It can be poisonous if you don’t know what you are doing. 

Mistletoe should not be used in combination with drugs that suppress the immune system, due to the fact that it stimulates the immune system.

Mistletoe should be used with caution by diabetics taking insulin as it may have the potential to stimulate insulin secretion. [28]

If taking antihypertensive drugs, mistletoe has been shown to lower blood pressure and may compound the effect of the drug.

If you have a known allergy to members of the Viscaceae or Loranthaceae plant families, it should definitely be avoided.

Finally, those who have seizure disorders should avoid mistletoe. If you are pregnant or breast feeding, use mistletoe with great caution and always under the supervision of a qualified doctor.

The Bottom Line

Despite obvious limitations and mixed results with many studies, it appears that positive studies on the effects of mistletoe therapy for cancer patients are accumulating. I personally know quite a few who have used mistletoe therapy as a part of their breast cancer treatments. They did not use them as the sole therapy against breast cancer, nor would I advise that. Mistletoe is not yet a proven cancer treatment and should not be used as a stand-alone treatment. However, in combination with other therapies, I believe the research and evidence shows there may be ample benefits for immunity, possible benefits for tumor regression, and certainly improved quality of life.

Interesting Tidbits

Mistletoe is believed to have been named using the Celtic word for “all-heal.”
Actress Suzanne Somers and former US president Ronald Reagan traveled to Germany to undergo mistletoe therapy for their cancers and both experienced good results. 

References:
[1] Efficacy and safety of mistletoe preparations (Viscum album) for patients with cancer diseases. A systematic review – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19729932/

[2] Mediation of human NK-activity by components in extracts of Viscum album – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/3583510/

[3] Chemical specificity of effector cell/tumor cell bridging by a Viscum album rhamnogalacturonan enhancing cytotoxicity of human NK cells – https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/016231099090028D

[4] Biochemical characterization of a component in extracts of Viscum album enhancing human NK cytotoxicity – https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/0162310989900039

[5] Immunomodulatory effects of Viscum album extracts on natural killer cells: review of clinical trials – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20484913/

[6] Article: White-Berry Mistletoe ( Viscum album L.) as complementary treatment in cancer: Does it help? – https://www.researchgate.net/publication/251711567_White-Berry_Mistletoe_Viscum_album_L_as_complementary_treatment_in_cancer_Does_it_help

[7] Cytotoxic activity and absence of tumor growth stimulation of standardized mistletoe extracts in human tumor models in vitro – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17352237/

[8] Quality of life in breast cancer patients during chemotherapy and concurrent therapy with a mistletoe extract – https://www.researchgate.net/publication/45720483_Quality_of_life_in_breast_cancer_patients_during_chemotherapy_and_concurrent_therapy_with_a_mistletoe_extract

[9] Effects of Viscum album Extract Therapy in Patients with Cancer: Relation with Interleukin-6, Soluble Interleukin-6 Receptor, and Soluble gp130 – https://www.researchgate.net/publication/8541896_Effects_of_Viscum_album_Extract_Therapy_in_Patients_with_Cancer_Relation_with_Interleukin-6_Soluble_Interleukin-6_Receptor_and_Soluble_gp130

[10] Immunoactive effects of various mistletoe lectin-1 dosages in mammary carcinoma patients – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/7779151/

[11] Measurements of IL-6, soluble IL-6 receptor and soluble gp130 in sera of B-cell lymphoma patients. Does viscum album treatment affect these parameters? – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12046687/

[12] Immunologic response to mistletoe extract (Viscum album L.) after conventional treatment in patients with operable breast cancer – https://koreauniv.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/immunologic-response-to-mistletoe-extract-viscum-album-l-after-co

[13] Mistletoe therapy in oncology – https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD003297.pub2/full#:~:text=Of%20the%2016%20trials%20investigating,patients%20during%20chemotherapy%20were%20of

[14] Viscum album L. extracts in breast and gynaecological cancers: a systematic review of clinical and preclinical research – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2711058/

[15] Disappearance of an advanced adenomatous colon polyp after intratumoural injection with Viscum album (European mistletoe) extract: a case report – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25532007/

[16] Interaction of a standardized mistletoe (Viscum album) preparation with antitumor effects of Trastuzumab in vitro – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4973521/

[17] Impact of complementary mistletoe extract treatment on quality of life in breast, ovarian and non-small cell lung cancer patients. A prospective randomized controlled clinical trial – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15015612/

[18] Complementary cancer therapy: a systematic review of prospective clinical trials on anthroposophic mistletoe extracts – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17507307/

[19] Additional Therapy with a Mistletoe Product during Adjuvant Chemotherapy of Breast Cancer Patients Improves Quality of Life: An Open Randomized Clinical Pilot Trial – https://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2014/430518/

[20] Preclinical and Clinical Effects of Mistletoe against Breast Cancer – https://www.researchgate.net/publication/264903226_Preclinical_and_Clinical_Effects_of_Mistletoe_against_Breast_Cancer

[21] Cancer Patients’ Experiences of Using Mistletoe (Viscum album): A Qualitative Systematic Review and Synthesis – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26684278/

[22] Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis of Survival and Psychosomatic Self-regulation from Published Prospective Controlled Cohort Studies for Long-term Therapy of Breast Cancer Patients with a Mistletoe Preparation (Iscador) – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2862937/

[23] Survival of cancer patients treated with mistletoe extract (Iscador): a systematic literature review – https://bmccancer.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2407-9-451

[24] Retrolective studies on the survival of cancer patients treated with mistletoe extracts: a meta-analysis – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22938746/

[25] Is Mistletoe Treatment Beneficial in Invasive Breast Cancer? A New Approach to an Unresolved Problem – http://ar.iiarjournals.org/content/38/3/1585.abstract

[26] Complementary cancer therapy: a systematic review of prospective clinical trials on anthroposophic mistletoe extracts – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17507307/

[27] Review article: Influence of Viscum album L (European mistletoe) extracts on quality of life in cancer patients: a systematic review of controlled clinical studies – https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20483874/

[28] Insulin-secreting activity of the traditional antidiabetic plant Viscum album (mistletoe) – https://joe.bioscientifica.com/view/journals/joe/160/3/409.xmlMonograph: Ottawa Integrative Cancer Centre Monograph on Mistletoe – https://silo.tips/download/professional-resource-mistletoe

Article Topics

About Marnie Clark

marnie clark breast cancer coach

Hi I’m Marnie Clark, breast cancer survivor turned coach. I have 20 years of experience in natural medicine.  In 2004/05 I battled breast cancer myself. You can see more about my journey on my page Breast Cancer Diary.

I’ve been healthy and recurrence-free since 2004 and in 2012 I became a Breast Cancer Coach because I became aware of the fact that whilst there is now a wealth of information on the Internet, much of it is confusing, conflicting, and sometimes just wrong!

So it is my duty to help you unconfuse and untangle all that information, and find what works for YOU.

GET MY BEST TIPS on healthy ways to beat breast cancer and prevent recurrences by signing up for my free e-newsletters and eBooks.

You can also “like” me on Facebook (Marnie Clark, Breast Health Coach) to get my inspirational snippets, news and updates. I promise to do my utmost to keep you informed and empowered on your healing journey… and beyond.

Subscribe On YouTube

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Subscribe For Extra Support

Welcome to the Marnie Clark Breast Care Community. When you join my virtual family you will receive my informative newsletter PLUS my gift to you, these 2 eBooks valued at $47 to empower and support you on your breast cancer journey.

My subscribers also get a treasure trove of info on nutrition, supplements and lifestyle tips on surviving breast cancer.

“Thank you for the email and the meaningful words. I also wanted to thank you for being with me during my treatments. Your emails and posts not only gave me information but lots of courage.” Susan Z, Canada

Are Collagen Supplements Safe for Breast Cancer Survivors?

Are Collagen Supplements Safe for Breast Cancer Survivors?

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Are Collagen Supplements Safe for Breast Cancer Survivors?

I’ve been getting an increasing amount of questions about whether collagen supplements are safe for breast cancer survivors, and indeed, I’ve run across a few articles lately warning us about collagen supplementation. So today’s article is dedicated to shedding some light on the subject, and hopefully answering that question.
 
If you’ve noticed, there are a number of companies promoting collagen supplements at the moment. They are promoting it hard – like a new wonder drug – for better skin and nails, better hair (which I suspect is the reason people are asking me about collagen, to help them with hair loss due to breast cancer treatments), better gut health, for weight loss, and for its so-called anti-aging benefits.
 
But is it safe for breast cancer survivors? At first glance, one would think, well why not? If it’s already in our bodies, why wouldn’t it be safe?
 
Let’s look a little deeper into this.
 
The Role of Collagen 
 
Collagen is a long chain of proteins and sugars (known as a glycoprotein), and is the most abundant protein within our bodies. Collagen is found in skin, hair, cartilage, and many other tissues, and it is absolutely vital. Collagen is also the major component of something called the extracellular matrix, or ECM.
 
The ECM is a network of molecules such as collagen, enzymes, fibers, proteins and glycoproteins that exist outside of our cells – sort of like a scaffold, in order to support the cells with which they are associated. The ECM provides structural and biochemical support to the cells surrounding the ECM and there is an interaction between cells and the ECM – it helps to inform cells about growth and many other functions. [1]
 
The interaction between cells and the ECM provides for things like regulation of gene expression, cell differentiation and growth. So far so good. But this interaction between the ECM and cells can also play an important role in the growth of a tumor and its ability to grow and spread.
 
The Science
 
According to Sara Musetti, scientist and co-founder of OncoBites, a cancer research outreach blog, cancer takes all the good things about collagen and turns them into a nightmare. Musetti tells us “Collagen is used to support and protect, so naturally tumors twist it to their advantage. Tumors are often full of fibroblasts, the major cell type responsible for producing collagen. These cells pump out huge amounts of collagen, swaddling little pockets of tumor cells, called tumor nests, in blankets of collagen that keep damaging agents away. These collagen-rich regions form a physical barrier around tumor cells that keep chemotherapeutics, immune cells, antibodies, and other therapies from reaching the cells to kill them. The particular shape and character of collagen in a tumor has even been linked to how easily the tumor grows and spreads.” [2]
 
I found that fascinating – this ability of collagen to hide tumor cells in protective pockets so that immune cells and chemo drugs can’t get to them.
 
A 2013 study [3] found that DDR2, a protein that sits on the surface of tumor cells and binds to collagen, activates a pathway that encourages the spread and invasiveness of tumor cells. Researchers stated that DDR2 might very well be a good therapeutic target for treating metastasized breast cancer.
 
A 2014 paper [4] in Tumour Biology stated “While collagen was traditionally regarded as a passive barrier to resist tumor cells, it is now evident that collagen is also actively involved in promoting tumor progression. Collagen changes in tumor microenvironment release biomechanical signals, which are sensed by both tumor cells and stromal cells, trigger a cascade of biological events. In this work, we discuss how collagen can be a double-edged sword in tumor progression, both inhibiting and promoting tumor progression at different stages of cancer development.”
 
Another 2014 paper [5] stated that both hyaluronan (another glycoprotein found in the ECM) and collagen VI are upregulated (promoted) in breast cancer, generating a microenvironment that promotes the progression of a tumor and also metastasis. 
 
In her 2015 YouTube video “Understanding the Role of Collagen in Breast Cancer” [6], Dr Patricia Kelly explains that breast cancer cells use the collagen network in order to travel to other parts of the body. 
 
A 2016 article in Science Signaling [7] stated that TM4SF1 (a protein encoded by the gene TM4SF1) promoted the reactivation of dormant breast cancer cells in the lung, bone, and brain by promoting signaling when cells came into contact with type I collagen. Also, high TM4SF1 expression correlated with reduced metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients, and that for those who had high expression of TM4SF1, this was highly predictive of their breast cancer recurrence.
 
Interestingly, it appears that different types of collagen can also suppress tumor growth. A 2015 animal study [8] found that type III collagen (col3) suppressed the carcinogenic microenvironment of a developing tumor. That was the only study I found that showed a particular type of collagen suppressed tumor growth.
 
A 2018 study [9] found that type 1 collagen promoted breast cancer cell growth and the ability to migrate to distant parts of the body.
 
Another 2018 study [10] also showed that collagen type 1A1 promoted breast cancer metastasis.
 
A 2018 article published in Breast Cancer Research [11] stated “Increased collagen expression and deposition are associated with cancer progression and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients.” The focus of the study was on a type of collagen known as collagen XIII. It was found that expression of this form of collagen was significantly higher in human breast cancer tissue compared with normal, healthy breast tissue, and that increased collagen XIII levels in breast cancer tissue correlated with increased tumor recurrence, promoted invasive tumor growth and enhanced breast cancer cells.
 
A 2019 review of medical studies on collagen [12] called collagen a “double-edged sword” with regard to cancer. The review reiterated the fact that our bodies have lots of collagen and require it for proper functioning. However, collagen is the major component of the tumor microenvironment and has been shown to participate in cancer development. Cancer cells use and reshape collagen, utilizing it to improve invasiveness, increase the ability of cancer cells to resist dying off, for building new blood vessels (angiogenesis), and many other functions, which gradually promotes cancer progression. Also, collagen-rich environments lack oxygen (known as hypoxia), which intensifies cancer progression. 
 
The study at [12] concluded: “Cells and molecules in the tumor microenvironment have dual effects on cancer progression. The role of collagen is a double-edged sword in cancer. On the one hand, collagen, cancer cells, other cells, and other matrix molecules mutually form an inter-reinforcing loop. This loop contributes to the development of cancer by inducing cancer cells proliferation, migration, and metastasis. On the other hand, preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that collagen may slow the development of cancer cells to some extent under some conditions. In summary, the association of collagen with cancer is only partially understood, and future studies are needed to elucidate detailed collagen biological mechanisms in cancer tissue that can be applied to precisely regulate collagen balance to achieve the maximum benefit of treatment. This new strategy combined with other treatment modalities can ultimately improve patient survival and quality of life.” 
 
One Chinese doctor at a burns unit in a Beijing Hospital (who did not wish to be named) clearly held a dim view of collagen supplementation, calling them absolutely useless. He said that after digestion, collagen disintegrates into amino acids, which are also found in the proteins of commonly-consumed foods like eggs, meat and beans. “The best result you can hope for after eating collagen is no effect,” the doctor said. “It would be more dangerous if you found the collagen effective, because then estrogen must have been added to the product.”
 
The Bottom Line
 
It is clear that researchers believe that many types of collagen promote tumor growth. Because it has been observed that breast cancer patients with high levels of collagen in their tumors often have less than optimal outcomes, it is advisable to steer clear of collagen supplementation if you have active cancer tumors in your body.
 
Because we do not have a definitive answer on whether collagen supplementation is safe for those whose tumors are gone, here’s what I would recommend.
 
Until we understand more about collagen supplementation, I intend to live by this quotation by wise old Benjamin Franklin: “When in doubt, don’t”. 
 
If you are considered to be cancer free and you believe collagen will be of benefit to you, and your doctor agrees with that, proceed with caution. I don’t believe women with dense breasts should supplement with collagen, as high collagen levels are the reason for increased breast density and are related to higher breast cancer risk. [13]
 
References:
 
[1] Video: Extracellular Matrix: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/structure-of-a-cell/cytoskeleton-junctions-and-extracellular-structures/v/extracellular-matrix
 
[2] Article: The Double-Edged Sword of Collagen — https://oncobites.blog/2019/12/06/the-double-edged-sword-of-collagen/
 
[3] The collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 stabilizes SNAIL1 to facilitate breast cancer metastasis — https://www.nature.com/articles/ncb2743
 
[4] Collagen as a double-edged sword in tumor progression – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3980040/
 
[5] Collagen VI and Hyaluronan: The Common Role in Breast Cancer – https://www.hindawi.com/journals/bmri/2014/606458/
 
[6] Video: Understanding the Role of Collagen in Breast Cancer – https://youtu.be/uAHpvwv9iqg
 
[7] Cancer reactivated by collagen – https://stke.sciencemag.org/content/9/437/ec165
 
[8] Type III Collagen Directs Stromal Organization and Limits Metastasis in a Murine Model of Breast Cancer — https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0002944015001285
 
[9] Collagen type 1 promotes survival of human breast cancer cells by overexpressing Kv10.1 potassium and Orai1 calcium channels through DDR1-dependent pathway – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5973854/
 
[10] Collagen – col1A1 – Promotes Metastasis of Breast Cancer and is a Potential Therapeutic Target —
https://www.discoverymedicine.com/Jing-Liu/2018/05/collagen-col1a1-promotes-metastasis-of-breast-cancer-potential-therapeutic-target/
 
[11] Membrane associated collagen XIII promotes cancer metastasis and enhances anoikis resistance – https://breast-cancer-research.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13058-018-1030-y#:~:text=Increased%20collagen%20expression%20and%20deposition,protein%20within%20the%20collagen%20superfamily.
 
[12] The role of collagen in cancer: from bench to bedside – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6744664/
 
[13] Collagen Matrix Density Drives the Metabolic Shift in Breast Cancer Cells – https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352396416304674

Article Topics

About Marnie Clark

marnie clark breast cancer coach

Hi I’m Marnie Clark, breast cancer survivor turned coach. I have 20 years of experience in natural medicine.  In 2004/05 I battled breast cancer myself. You can see more about my journey on my page Breast Cancer Diary.

I’ve been healthy and recurrence-free since 2004 and in 2012 I became a Breast Cancer Coach because I became aware of the fact that whilst there is now a wealth of information on the Internet, much of it is confusing, conflicting, and sometimes just wrong!

So it is my duty to help you unconfuse and untangle all that information, and find what works for YOU.

GET MY BEST TIPS on healthy ways to beat breast cancer and prevent recurrences by signing up for my free e-newsletters and eBooks.

You can also “like” me on Facebook (Marnie Clark, Breast Health Coach) to get my inspirational snippets, news and updates. I promise to do my utmost to keep you informed and empowered on your healing journey… and beyond.

Subscribe On YouTube

marnie clark youtube

Subscribe For Extra Support

Welcome to the Marnie Clark Breast Care Community. When you join my virtual family you will receive my informative newsletter PLUS my gift to you, these 2 eBooks valued at $47 to empower and support you on your breast cancer journey.

My subscribers also get a treasure trove of info on nutrition, supplements and lifestyle tips on surviving breast cancer.

“Thank you for the email and the meaningful words. I also wanted to thank you for being with me during my treatments. Your emails and posts not only gave me information but lots of courage.” Susan Z, Canada

How to Treat Mouth Sores from Chemo Treatment

How to Treat Mouth Sores from Chemo Treatment

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Subscribe to be notified when new articles are published. You’ll also receive my 2 free ebooks to assist you on your journey.

My subscribers also get a treasure trove of info on nutrition, supplements and lifestyle tips on surviving breast cancer.

How to Treat Mouth Sores from Chemo Treatment

How to Treat Mouth Sores from Chemo Treatment

There is quite possibly nothing more sore than the open lesions that can occur in your mouth while undergoing chemotherapy. Oh, they hurt. You can tell I speak from experience, and I learned very quickly what to do to keep them away, and I share all of that information (and more!) in this video.

The reason these mouth sores occur is because the chemotherapy drugs are targeting all rapidly dividing cells in the body, and that (unfortunately) includes the mucosa of the inside of the mouth, all the way down to the stomach. These cells are busy – they divide approximately every 24 hours and are constantly being shed.

The best course of action to take is to begin what is recommended in this video BEFORE you even start chemotherapy so that you keep all of this from happening, because once they occur, these mouth sores can be very difficult to heal up again. In hurts when you eat, when you drink anything hot and even (depending on its location) hurts to talk. 

If you are looking to get rid of a mouth sore or two that have already occurred, worry not – this will definitely speed up the process.

For more information on things you can do to help with your chemotherapy treatments, see these articles

I hope you found this helpful. If you are recently diagnosed, you may also want to visit my page Recently Diagnosed? Start Here

Article Topics

About Marnie Clark

marnie clark breast cancer coach

Hi I’m Marnie Clark, breast cancer survivor turned coach. I have 20 years of experience in natural medicine.  In 2004/05 I battled breast cancer myself. You can see more about my journey on my page Breast Cancer Diary.

I’ve been healthy and recurrence-free since 2004 and in 2012 I became a Breast Cancer Coach because I became aware of the fact that whilst there is now a wealth of information on the Internet, much of it is confusing, conflicting, and sometimes just wrong!

So it is my duty to help you unconfuse and untangle all that information, and find what works for YOU.

GET MY BEST TIPS on healthy ways to beat breast cancer and prevent recurrences by signing up for my free e-newsletters and eBooks.

You can also “like” me on Facebook (Marnie Clark, Breast Health Coach) to get my inspirational snippets, news and updates. I promise to do my utmost to keep you informed and empowered on your healing journey… and beyond.

Subscribe On YouTube

marnie clark youtube

Subscribe For Extra Support

Welcome to the Marnie Clark Breast Care Community. When you join my virtual family you will receive my informative newsletter PLUS my gift to you, these 2 eBooks valued at $47 to empower and support you on your breast cancer journey.

My subscribers also get a treasure trove of info on nutrition, supplements and lifestyle tips on surviving breast cancer.

“Thank you for the email and the meaningful words. I also wanted to thank you for being with me during my treatments. Your emails and posts not only gave me information but lots of courage.” Susan Z, Canada

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